Video 1 Oct 577 notes
via reg says.
Text 1 Oct 12 notes

letussallyforth:

N and I have been watching The History of Film on Netflix, and I am enjoying it, but of course can’t help but notice how many movies were and still are just stories of white dudes talking about white dudes directed by white dudes.

I know this is to be expected, but that doesn’t make it right.

Also: Fuck Gus Van Sant.

Additionally, I grow progressively more bored with old white dude shit.

Recommendations?

Catherine Breillat’s film are rough (like they punch you in the soul) but powerfully feminine.  

Maya Deren made fantastic surreal short films that really pushed the medium. 

Both pre and post-war Japanese film is really interesting if you want to get away from white guy stuff. It is still guy stuff for the most part, but a different perspective.Also is a different kind of sexism that can be interesting to understand.  (Ozu, Kenji Mizoguchi, and Kurosawa) 

Lynne Ramsay a great Scottish director. Ratcatcher is a fave, and We Need to Talk about Kevin was super underrated. 

Mira Nair is an Indian filmmaker and worth digging into. 

Agnes Varda’s whole filmography is worth going through. Cleo from 5 to 7 is sooooooo good.

Lina Wertmüller is an Italian filmmaker and I would say check out Love and Anarchy.

Photo 1 Oct 18 notes 40 years ago today The Texas Chainsaw Massacre was released.
A perpetual lock at Top 5 Greatest Horror Movies of all time. Here is a nice little article talking about the films lasting power. 
Some choice excerpts that I fully agree with:
“Death’s inevitability is sitting right there in the title of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre. There’s no ambiguous “nightmare” or “legend” or “night of terror” in that title. Right there on your admission ticket, it’s printed in black and white: Death is coming. En masse. With that one title, you’ve been told the what, the where and the how. (An opening dateline provides the when; you will never get the why.) The film that follows is not an escapist, spooky funhouse ride. It’s a funeral dirge.” 
“Its soundscape never became dated because it is singular in the history of the genre; nothing has sounded like it before or since. The sound design is near-flawless, impregnating even the quiet moments with a droning sense of doom. It’s the heavy silence of a funeral director’s office, or an oncologist’s waiting room. It’s the noisy silence of blood pounding in your ears during a panic attack.”
“Unpredictable, unknowable chaos reigns in Hooper’s film, a marked contrast from the subgenre it helped birth. Later slasher films would evolve into a rigid set of rules by which characters would live or die; abstinence was rewarded, vice and promiscuity were punished. In a way the slashers came to really epitomize the ‘80s mindset, nearly right-wing in their code of conformity. They reassure a status quo; they’re downright comfortingin their predictability. This is not the case with The Texas Chain Saw Massacre. There are no ground rules as per Wes Craven’s Scream; no one is safe. Our heroes don’t fit the stereotypes of slasher victims, and aside from Franklin’s wheelchair-bound whining, the characters are fairly nondescript. But beyond that well-trod observation, even more unsettling is that these are good kids. They’ve heard reports of grave-robbing in the area, and they’ve gone out of their way to make sure their grandpa’s remains are undisturbed. They are checking on their dead grandpa. It’s a sweet, human, honorable goal. The film does not care. 84 minutes later, they’re all fodder for a saw that’s still swinging when the screen cuts to black.”
“ But more than anything I can’t shake the weird angle of these characters dying horribly simply because of where their grandfather happened to live (and die). That vanload of victims had been tied to their cannibalistic murderers for decades before August 18, 1973. Whatever it is that’s gonna kill you, the film reminds us, has probably happened already, and there’s nothing you can do about it. You were always going to end up on that meat hook.”

40 years ago today The Texas Chainsaw Massacre was released.

A perpetual lock at Top 5 Greatest Horror Movies of all time. Here is a nice little article talking about the films lasting power. 

Some choice excerpts that I fully agree with:

Death’s inevitability is sitting right there in the title of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre. There’s no ambiguous “nightmare” or “legend” or “night of terror” in that title. Right there on your admission ticket, it’s printed in black and white: Death is coming. En masse. With that one title, you’ve been told the what, the where and the how. (An opening dateline provides the when; you will never get the why.) The film that follows is not an escapist, spooky funhouse ride. It’s a funeral dirge.” 

Its soundscape never became dated because it is singular in the history of the genre; nothing has sounded like it before or since. The sound design is near-flawless, impregnating even the quiet moments with a droning sense of doom. It’s the heavy silence of a funeral director’s office, or an oncologist’s waiting room. It’s the noisy silence of blood pounding in your ears during a panic attack.”

Unpredictable, unknowable chaos reigns in Hooper’s film, a marked contrast from the subgenre it helped birth. Later slasher films would evolve into a rigid set of rules by which characters would live or die; abstinence was rewarded, vice and promiscuity were punished. In a way the slashers came to really epitomize the ‘80s mindset, nearly right-wing in their code of conformity. They reassure a status quo; they’re downright comfortingin their predictability. This is not the case with The Texas Chain Saw Massacre. There are no ground rules as per Wes Craven’s Scream; no one is safe. Our heroes don’t fit the stereotypes of slasher victims, and aside from Franklin’s wheelchair-bound whining, the characters are fairly nondescript. But beyond that well-trod observation, even more unsettling is that these are good kids. They’ve heard reports of grave-robbing in the area, and they’ve gone out of their way to make sure their grandpa’s remains are undisturbed. They are checking on their dead grandpa. It’s a sweet, human, honorable goal. The film does not care. 84 minutes later, they’re all fodder for a saw that’s still swinging when the screen cuts to black.”

 But more than anything I can’t shake the weird angle of these characters dying horribly simply because of where their grandfather happened to live (and die). That vanload of victims had been tied to their cannibalistic murderers for decades before August 18, 1973. Whatever it is that’s gonna kill you, the film reminds us, has probably happened already, and there’s nothing you can do about it. You were always going to end up on that meat hook.”

Photo 1 Oct I was thinking about cartoons (as you do) and I suddenly remembered this show with the awful name “Kissyfur”, but the villains were these rad crocodiles. Look at that hair! Hair on a crocodile! What a thing to have witnessed. 

I was thinking about cartoons (as you do) and I suddenly remembered this show with the awful name “Kissyfur”, but the villains were these rad crocodiles. Look at that hair! Hair on a crocodile! What a thing to have witnessed. 

Text 1 Oct 5 notes

dismissivejerkoffmotion replied to your photo:Well it is October and that means a whole lotta…

Burbs soon?

I am going to need to get my hands on a copy. I don’t THINK it is on Netflix. 

Photo 1 Oct 21 notes Well it is October and that means a whole lotta horror movie watching for our household. 
To kick things off we watched the X-Files pilot episode. Not traditionally horror or a film, but Jess has never seen a single episode of the show. It felt like the right time to change this. 

Well it is October and that means a whole lotta horror movie watching for our household. 

To kick things off we watched the X-Files pilot episode. Not traditionally horror or a film, but Jess has never seen a single episode of the show. It felt like the right time to change this. 

Photo 1 Oct 9,437 notes

(Source: zenigata)

Video 30 Sep 156,586 notes
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Photo 30 Sep 8 notes endling81:

HERE’S WHAT I LOOK LIKE IN 73345.443 MEGAPIXELS.



Jeff did you get secretly married?

endling81:

HERE’S WHAT I LOOK LIKE IN 73345.443 MEGAPIXELS.

Jeff did you get secretly married?


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